By using Feng Shui in your home you could attract enough money to pay off your debts!?!  Maybe you will have some left over for a holiday or a special treat!!

Keep loo seats and lids down.  Water flowing out of the house takes the money with it!!  Men seem to be the worse culprits for leaving the seat up so make a sign to go over your loo saying, “Please put the lid down on this loo, don’t let our money wash away!”  What got me interested in Feng Shui was a friend telling me about the loo theory.  Just using this simple tip made sure there was always money coming into the house rather than flowing freely out.  Even the children will do it if you explain why – mine loved it as it was something even they could do to help the household.

Make sure your front door is clean and well kept.  Oil it if it is squeaking as this is where money comes into the house.  Place a couple of heavy pots or statues either side of the door, inside or out, to hold the money down – once you have it you do not want it rushing straight out again.

Goldfish attract money so place a tank or bowl in the wealth area (South) of your house, study or office.  If your wealth area is naturally dark place a bright lamp there.

Red and green are associated with wealth so make sure you have something in these colours in the wealth area.

Your kitchen is also equated with wealth.  Make sure it is spotless, uncluttered and well lit.  Keep your oven spotless and keep burners/hotplates unclogged or you will never pay off your debts – the more burners you use the more money comes in!!!

I gave the loo seat trick to my brother for his birthday a few years ago and 2 months later he rang to thank me. He was an unemployed builder on his birthday (due to an injury at work) but he hasnt been out of work since. Honestly!! The first thing that happened was that he was given a payment that he had been fighting for for months, he then won a smaller sum and was then offered work that he’d been after for a while.

Give it a go – this really works i can vouch for it.

© 2002 Sarah Marsden